Aquarium Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Aspiring Aquarist
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, I just got my first fish tank last week. I am currently cycling it (fishless) and I have been spending a lot of time researching what types of fish to put in it and what type of decor that can go there. I am leaning towards getting a few different barbs, which leads to my first question :

Since barbs are schooling fish I have found that you should get 5 or 6 of them at a time. I was thinking of maybe getting a couple of tiger barbs and then a couple of panda barbs, like 2 or 3 of each. Is it ok to mix different species in one group?

I also wanted to get a couple of cichlids, either on their own or mix them with barbs. I have seen some people put them in 10 gallons but I am not sure if they will be happy and have enough room in there. Also, I am not sure if they could get along with barbs. I haven't checked out if they need the same water conditions either. This leads me to my second question,

Would it be possible to mix a cichlid or two with about 5 or 6 barbs and have them a) get along and B) not be overcrowded in my tank?

I have also taken into account that I will need an algae eater. I am not getting a pleco because I know that they can get very large and also create more waste than they clean up. I was thinking about getting an oto or two, but are there any other types of algae eaters besides plecos and catfish types? I don't care for catfish all that much. I am also not sure about putting inverts in my tank.


My final question is that I know I need to get some more plants and/or rocks or driftwood for my aquarium. I'd like to have enough room for my fish to be able to swim freely, but I know that they also need places to hide. What would be some good choices for decor?



Thanks for your time! *c/p* I appreciate any feedback.
 

·
Queen Platy
Joined
·
932 Posts
I dont know if Barbs and Cichlids go along together, but I do know cichlids get really big. Its alright if you have them if they're babies, but they will soon outgrow your tank and will need 30gallon minimum. Cichlids such as Oscars, get 10 inches big and will need 100gallon. I think keeping barbs alone would be good since they stay fairly small. 4 fish would be ideal to prevent overcrowding but I think you can push it to 5-6 like you wanted. Otos are schooling fish, they're shy and sensitive and will die in aggressive environments or get eaten. And both cichlids and barbs I believe are aggressive.

I personally have never kept cichlids or barbs but I know about their temperaments.
If I gave the wrong advice, someone correct me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: logansmomma1228

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Nurse Platy, you were exactly correct. The Cichlid group does get VERY large and AGGRESSIVE. They tend to be more aggressive the more there are. In a 100 gallon tank 10 of them will begin to get very social and begin to establish an order of rank that will constantly challenge each other. They are beautiful to observe, but are not for the beginner. You were totally correct in everything you said, cool. By reading over the stats of your 20 gal. plant tank, I now see that you have been doing this for a while, and apologize if I have offended you. You quite obviously know what you are doing. :)
 

·
Aspiring Aquarist
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So what would be some good things to put in for the barbs then? I am thinking some plants for them to hide in and a little cave rock type thing. There just isn't a whole lot of room in there and i would like them to have plenty of room! I guess when I get a bigger tank I can go for the cichlids and set it up as a species tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I agree with everyone else's comments. Tiger barbs are a good fish for the beginner because they are attractive and hardy. Like most barbs they do tend to be a little on the aggressive side and can be fin nippers, which may limit what you can put in the tank with them. Livebearers are often a good choice for the beginner and many of them do not get too big for a ten gallon, guppies are a good choice and they come in a variety of colors. There are several varieties of tetras that also stay small and are peaceful schooling fish. White clouds and zebra danios are also good choices. Most cichlids do get too large for a ten gallon. Do not get pacus, most stores like Petsmart sell them small but they quickly outgrow their tank. A mystery snail is a good addition for a small tank as are cory cats who now come in a large variety colors. These are just a few suggestions. You are smart to do your homework before you buy.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top