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Discussion Starter #1
What do you think is the best solution to keeping Cyano out of your tank, and if it appears, how do you get rid of it, without doing any damage to your set-up


 

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The best solution is keeping nutrients in the tank at the lowest level possible by skimming. Keep your flow up with powerheads or an effective closed loop system. Make sure that the tubes or bulbs in your lighting system are changed when needed.

If you still develop it, it can be reduced significantly on a temporary basis to allow you to make the necessary corrections to your set up. To do this simply keep your tank lights off for three days. This isn't long enough to hurt any of your corals but it will really knock back your cyano. You may also want to siphon off as much as you can and perform a water change.
 

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~/root
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I have like a brown, rust color algae on a lot (but not all) of my sand. Is this the same type of algae you are talking about?
 

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Not sure but you may be describing Diatoms, maybe somebody will help us out here
 

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their is a product on market that works very well you add a small like maybe a amount the size of standard pencil eraser it works very well safe for corals too cant rember the name
was something like cyro buster ect serach for red alage in aquariums to find it i got it at pet soulutions
 

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I've seen what you are talking about its like red slime remover or something like that.

I've heard bad things about using that with inverts however i believe the bottle says "reef safe" or something along those lines.
 

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Red slime is the byproduct of the action of gyano(green)bacteria. It develops as the bacteria feed. It is present in small amounts in just about every system. I have some in my sump.

I would really avoid any of the red slime killers. They are antibiotics and can do serious damage to your beneficial bacteria as well. Try siphoning, increasing flow and lights out for three days. I think you will be pleasantly surprised.
 

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I just wanted to agree with what dr hank has said here.

The 3 day lights out as simple, as easy, as daha as it seems works wonders.

Especially when paired with macro algaes usually in a refugium.



We had a very experienced sps grower here that developed red slime. He read, researched and at first thought 'it couldn't be as simple as just killing the lights'. But he tried it and 3 days later the cyano was gone. And it came back 3 weeks later just as detractors would worry about. So he at first thought he would do a monthly 3 day black out. But a funny thing happened after the second 3 day black out. The cyano has not come back for almost a year now.

What I think happens is cyano can get it's nitrogen from nitrogen gas vrs ammonia/nitrates. So with anaerobic bacteria action it is possible even normal the tank becomes nitrate starved. The algaes slow down growth which increases phosphates. At that point there is low nitrates, higher phosphates, and co2 in the tank. And even the possibility of nitrogen gas being returned at the surface of the sand bed.

Which all adds up to a very good environment for the cyano.

So after some months of operation the tank in a few days switches from being algae dominated to cyano dominated.

The killing the lights, kills off the cyano and returns nitrate to the system. So the system again favors the algaes.

At that point you just need to find the combination of algae and lighting (duration is easiest to change) that keeps the cyano away.

Gee did I write all that?

my .02
 
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lol i like u guys hahahahhahhah
 
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~/root
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this is what i have and its starting to take over all the substrate




PS:
My kole tang loves to get his picture taken. For some reason he needs to be in every shot I take.
 

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Watch the quality of water you put in the tank too, use only RO/DI for consistency. Tap water can contain things like phosphates, silicates and nitrates which can contribute to algae and diatom growth.
 
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