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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We changed the water in our tank today. We have a small tank and we replaced probably 2 gallons. The tank needed a good vacuuming anyway and we did it. But when we replaced the water it was REALLY REALLY cloudy. I checked the pH and the amonia levels and THERE IS A SLIGHT PRESENCE OF AMMONIA AND THE PH IS 6.0(normally 7.0).

Is the ammonia and the pH causing the water to cloud or is it other factors? What should I do about the cloudy water? What should I do about the ammonia and the pH?

Thank you all very much
 

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I watch the ammonia level closely and test the water sources Ph ,Kh for nitraite and ammonia. Just so you know what your starting point is at. I have two tanks that turn cloudy whenever I do a water change and I have others that do not, they generally clear up in a few hours.

I would be more concerned avout my Ph being 6.0 and an ammonia present after a water change. How long has the tank been set up, the size and stocking?
 

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The tank is about 3 weeks old. We had other cloudy water and we needed to change it. Everything was good. (My mouth rot fish died =/) so we decided to change some water. Then it got cloudy and after about seven hours its still cloudy. The tank is small only 3 fish in a 10 gallon tank.

What can I do about the pH and the ammonia?
 

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Seachem makes a Ph Neutral Regulator, that you add to the tank and to the water you use for the WC. In my eperience, I have tried the API Down and found out that I was having to add it everyday to get the Ph to hold, the Seachem i add only when I do WC's and it holds it right a 7.0....... I find that I have less cost.

As the tank is only 3 weeks old it has not gone thur the cycling process..... you need to wait until it cycles before restocking the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Seachem makes a Ph Neutral Regulator, that you add to the tank and to the water you use for the WC. In my eperience, I have tried the API Down and found out that I was having to add it everyday to get the Ph to hold, the Seachem i add only when I do WC's and it holds it right a 7.0....... I find that I have less cost.

As the tank is only 3 weeks old it has not gone thur the cycling process..... you need to wait until it cycles before restocking the tank.
Thank you very much but what do you mean by "cycles"?
 

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"Cycling" refers to the process of establishing and maturing biological filtration. Each new aquarium must go through cycling in order to establish efficient biological filtration capable of breaking down of toxic compounds. A food source for these bacteria, such as ammonia, is required to begin the cycling process. Certain beneficial bacteria use ammonia and oxygen to rapidly colonize aquarium and filter surfaces. During cycling, test daily for ammonia and nitrite, the most toxic products in the nitrogen cycle. Most basic test kits include tests for ammonia and nitrite. When these two toxins are detectable by testing, you know that the bacterial population is not large enough to safely support fish and other inhabitants. But, as bacteria populations peak, both ammonia and nitrite levels begin to drop to the point where they are undetectable by testing.

Finally it is safe to begin stocking your aquarium. Add fish and aquatic life gradually since your system will once again need time to adjust to the increased ammonia generated by each fish. After cycling is complete, it is recommend weekly testing of ammonia and nitrite to monitor water quality
 

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It depends on what color your cloudy water is. There could be several reasons for it. My guess would be a bacterial bloom. If you really disturbed the substrate it causes the bacteria to float in the tank. I've done this several times, it isn't anything to worry about and it clears up in 72 hours. If it's a bacterial bloom.

Personally I would avoid pH Down and pH Up. Those are just chemicals added to the water and they create an unpredictable rise or fall in pH, very quickly. Then the chemical wears off very quickly causing the pH to shoot back to where it was. Fluctuations in pH are much more harmful than a consistently low or high pH. You should look at the requirements for your fish. A 6.0 pH may be fine for them, in which case you are only causing harm by mucking with it.

Zambize
 

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I tried the PH up without success. On the advice of a long time hobbiest I did the following......
I did a 50% water change and added Baking Soda. I did 2 teaspoons for 55 gallons, so you'd need drastically less!
I added a chunk of Texas Holey Rock that is a natural PH lifter. Be fareful and check regularly for the next few hours to make sure it isn't spiking your PH. I've also heard of people putting some crushed coral in a stocking and leaving it in the tank for a while.

My Tank settled within 2 days, and has remained constant ever since.

One other piece of advice considering you are only 3 weeks into cycling. Leave the gravel alone, or only vac 1/4 of your gravel a week. Over cleaning can kill off your beneficial bacteria as well, causing ammonia to spike.

The cloudiness could be from a bacteria bloom if it's basically just clearish/milky whiteish. If so keep a close eye on all your levels. If green or brown it could be algea or ditritus from the bottom, but in only 3 weeks I'd doubt the gravel could be that dirty.

Best of luck.
 

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Fishyfaery...... what you did by adding the backing soda was change the KH of the water which in effect changes the Ph and Gh....... 2 teaspoons of baking soda to 55 gal of water would have raise your Kh up 4 points meaning if your tap water Kh is 2 (generally city water is) than your KH will be 6 and that is high ideal is 4 from everything I have read . You may wait to check your KH. I never heard that texas holly rock was a ph buffer only that it is ph neutral itself.

Like I stated before you need to test you water source so you have a base line to start with before you go and mess with your water chem. You should do what ever your going to do the tank water in a small bucket and test the results so you don't kill all your fish and have to strip the tank down and start over.

There is a thing that some tanks just get cloudy after WC's. It might be the dechlornater or other additives. It should go away in a few hours or over night.
 
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