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Discussion Starter #1
I want to upgrade tanks from my 29g to a 55g, my question is if i buy the 55g and set it up then just put my 2 filters on it and fill it with the water that i have in my existing tank and then just top it off with fresh water kind of like doing a water change will i have a problem with and cycling issues? my tank now is cycled and all the levels are perfect.

Thanks, Ryan
 

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Will are you getting rid of the 29gal. If you use the old dirty filter and the old gravel and water, you will go thur a mini cycle but not a complete cycle you can pu tyou fish in but keep an aya on the levels. You should be fine, I done it that way a couple of times when I had to breakdown and move the tank completely for tenting the house.
 

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Yeah i plan on using all the decor and gravel and just adding some more gravel and rocks, and i will fill the tank with the existing water and use my filtration. so everything will be cycled, then i will just top off the tank with fresh treated water like i do with water changes
 

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You didn't mention what type of fish or conditions. For instance if you have to soften the water, or maybe add some sea salt for a live bearer tank. These things can affect the tank. If you are working with sensitive fish, say discus or somthing like that then it could be a bit more tricky.

For most community tanks this will be fine. Using all the stuff from the original tank will help a lot.
 

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Hi, I am in a similar situation.. But I was wondering..
If I buy new substrate.. but keep it in say.. a cooler, full of water.. and periodically adding water from the tank now (upgrading 30 gallon to 75 gallon)... Would that water create bacteria in the new rocks?
Or is there a way to cycle rocks without actually having fish with them?
 

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I was able to do a full transplant of my 20g tank to 75g tank in a few days. I moved over my Magnum filter, some large stones, and live plants. All the gravel was new as was most of the water. I needed the few days to aquascape the tank and start up my CO2 injection.

All the fish survived the transplant. I used Prime in the new tank and was sure not to add any fish than I already had for 2 weeks just to be safe. It does not take much just be sure you don't accidentally kill the bacteria by forgetting to neutralize chlorine in the new tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I always buffer the water with cichlid salt and nuetralizer with water changes and i Plan to do the same to the new water added
 

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also add an air pump and stone to the cooler.

you should be fine the only thing is don't add any new fish until you mini cycle, in a week or two, than the biocolony will have a chance to spread and grow on the new gravel.
 

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djrichie,
could I also use that airpump in my tank?
I am a student and dont have a lot of extra money to spend on cycling some gravel..
 

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djrichie,
could I also use that airpump in my tank?
I am a student and dont have a lot of extra money to spend on cycling some gravel..

Sure just "T" off with an extra length of hose. air circulation is important in the process of cycling a tank. So is waste. I would try something like this:

1. Buy the new substrate, if it is the same as the small tank great, if not, then its only a little more challenging.

2. Get set up the new tank near the old tank. Not completely, as you won't need to fill the tank from the start.

3. Do a water change on your old tank, put the water that you drain into the new tank. If you drian using a gravel vacume even better.

4. If you can, mix some of the old gravel with the new. If not, any decorations, plants etc will work fine, as will seperating gravel with a piece of clean cloth (an old towel for instance) just make sure it is very well rinsed. You don't want soap or softeners in your new tank. Airate the new tank.

5. Next morning, test a sample of water from the new tank. Check pH, Nitrate, Nitrite, and Amonia. Record these readings in a notebook or spreadsheet. The log will become a source of pride, and a very usefull tool.

6. Procede through the cycle. Update your log every day. You should see a spike in amonia, and nitrite, then they should both fall off completely. Once this takes place, you should have a good colony of bacteria in the tank substrate.

Now for the hard work.

7. Empty most of the water out of the new tank. Keep it if you can.

8. Set up the new tank in its perminate location, this may require you to take down the old tank.

9. Get as much of the old water as you can. Fill with new dechlorinated water.

10. Place a small to medium biological load on the new tank. If you are going from say a 10gal to a 29, of even 55, this may be all of your existing fish.

Good luck. This sounds complicated, but it really is not. BTW, you have found a life long hobby. I started at 6, now I'm 45. I have had at least one tank for most of my life. It even provided money while I was in school.
 
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