Aquarium Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, since it is unlikely you know anything about me, I will tell you that I prefer convenience when it comes to monotonous tasks. So, when I found out that there was such a thing as a pH meter I was intrigued. Heck, maybe a pH meter would even save me some money in the long run if I found one cheap enough. But when I typed "aquarium pH meter" into Google Shopping, my interest turned to disappointment when the cheapest one I could find was Store Digital Instruments Hand Held Meters And Pens for 19 bucks. Granted, that's actually a decent deal when I think about it, but could I still find something cheaper? After more searching, I somehow came across soil pH meters, the cheapest one being Mosser Lee at Lowe's: Soil Master Moisture Light and pH Meter at 10 bucks. So my question is this: recommended use aside, is it possible to use a soil pH meter such as this one as a way to accurately gauge aquarium pH?

I may not ever decide to use it for this reason, but I am still curious if this is even theoretically possible. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
I have heard many many many times that unless you get professional grade electronics (like you find in a lab setting) you can not get anything that is as accurate as a liquid test kit. I understand the need/want to save money but if you spend $19.00 and its not accurate to me you have wasted $19.00. You can do hundreds of test's with a liquid test kit that is proven to be accurate and easy to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't see why it wouldn't work. pH is the same for aquarium water and soil - it is the measure of the hydrogen ion concentrations.
I agree that they measure the same thing, but maybe they measure it a different way as the medium (soil/water) is different? Who knows?

I have heard many many many times that unless you get professional grade electronics (like you find in a lab setting) you can not get anything that is as accurate as a liquid test kit. I understand the need/want to save money but if you spend $19.00 and its not accurate to me you have wasted $19.00. You can do hundreds of test's with a liquid test kit that is proven to be accurate and easy to do.
I definitely agree with you, and I'm a firm believer that you get what you pay for. I was just wondering if anyone has tried it and had any success. In your experience, how accurate does a pH reading need to be?
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top