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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The PH of my aquarium has been fluctuating from 7.4 to over 8.8 over the last 2 weeks. The last test I did showed 8.8, but that I used the API high range PH test kit, and it only reads up to 8.8, so I am assuming it may be even higher than that. (Ammonia and nitrites are at 0 ppm, and nitrate is at 10 ppm.)

I have been reluctant to use chemicals such as ph down to lower the ph, because of the rapid ph change and what it will do to my fish. Not to mention the ph will shoot back to what it previously was only a few hours before. I did add a decent size chunk of driftwood to my tank, but that has not had any affect lowering the ph.

While at petco, I came accross seachem netrual regulator. I did some quick research on the web but couldn't find any reviews of the product from people that have used it. Does anyone know about or use this product here? How would I go about introducing it to my tank without stressing the fish?

Thanks
 

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I also have a high pH problem with my tank, and am using the Seachem products. The neutral regulator did drop my pH for a short while, then it bounced back up. My local fish guru suggested using the Acid Buffer, first, to lower the pH, then use the Neutral Regulator to keep the pH within range. He did warn me that the acid buffer drops the pH quickly, though, and suggested I start with only half the suggested dose, which I did. So far, my fish are fine, no losses.
Then again, they were also all tolerating the high pH....
hope this helps
oh, and did you know, if you look further down in the forum, there is a Seachem one? They have a representative on this site....
 

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I've been using the Neutra Regulator and I'm liking it so far. Put my PH right at 7.0 and it's kept it there. I also like that fact that it dechlorinates the water as well.
 

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With heavily planted tanks where the plants are removing the carbon dioxide, I get pH of 8.4-8.8 with the api high range test kit. I do nothing and recommend not adding chemicals to lower the ph.

After all the pH is high because the plants are removing carbon dioxide and adding oxygen. Which can hardly be a bad thing for the fish. Even fish like neon tetras and silver hatchet fish which are reported to "need" much lower pH (6-7) do fine and live for years.


my .02
 
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My tank is not what I would call heavily planted, but it is planted, and, my pH is hovering around the 7.8 range ish..
but my fish, including my neons, don't seem to have an issue with it...
maybe I will just leave it for a bit and see what happens
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My tank has only one live plant in it, and that is a recent addition. Before I put the plant in (amazon sword) the ph was still in the 8's.
 

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I have a 1 kg container of the stuff that I bought when I got back into the hobby a few years back. At the time I thought it would be a good idea to use mostly RO water because my tap water is quite hard and I used the neutral regulator to stabilize my pH. Live and learn. The container is as full today as i was when I decided I was being silly and my fish were not doing too well. I stopped messing with my pH and have had much healthier fish ever since. With extreme water like a pH of 8.8 from the tap, I would try to mix in some RO just to get the chemistry to some stable point with less minerals in it. Chances are very good that tap water with a pH that high is also quite high in mineral content as measured by GH or TDS and will have a heavy buffering capacity as measured by KH. What that means, from a practical point of view, is that anything you do to try changing the pH will be in vain. It will bounce right back and the fish will get to follow it in both directions. Not exactly a good situation to put the fish into.
 

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You can also run into the opposite problem if your water is soft. My tap kH is 1-2 and GH is 2-3. I do a 25g water change every week and I add stuff to the new water to raise the kH, GH, and pH.

The key is using a buffer system so that it does not fluctuate too much, this is done by raising the kH while setting the target pH. I use 3 Seachem products: Equilibrium for GH and then Acid buffer and Akaline buffer for kH and pH. The last 2 buffers used together will get you to your target pH and keep it there.

I know exactly how much to add to the 25g trashcan and mix it all up the night before the water change, 1/4 tsp here 1/8tsp there....next day, i just add it to the tank after a vacuuming. All the Discus are healthy and are fine with a daily fluctuating pH from the pressurized CO2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Have yet to use the neutral regulator. I decided to mix distilled water with my tap water at a 50/50 ratio to lower the kh and ph of my tap water during water changes. Seems to be working well so far. once I do more water changes with the 50/50 mix of distilled and tap, I'll make a decision to use the neutral regulator based on the results.

Thanks for the responses so far!
 

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That sounds like a sensible approach to me Jeb. You have a nice predictable water that can be easily replicated whenever you need to do a water change. I use RO in much the same waty that you are using distilled for the fish that can't take my tap water. In my case I am mixing mine 3 RO to 1 tap to get the desired mineral content. My RO comes from the unit at the kitchen sink so it is fairly inexpensive for me to use it.
 
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