Aquarium Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I just bought some test strips that my pet store had in stock. And I just tested my water.

Ammonia - 0

Water Hardness - very hard

pH - 6.5

Nitrite - 20

Nitrate - 0

Alkalinity - 80

So it seems like my pH is acidic since my chart says that 6.8 - 7.2 is neutral. So I guess my fishes are still alive, and they aren't showing any signs of problems. All my tanks have no nitrate, or ammonia. And my largest tank has an alkalinity of 0, and a pH of 7.4.

Is there anything besides water changes that I should do for my tanks? I hear that some fishes like acidic water. I know that Angels probably wont, but my angels are still alive in all of my tanks (3 died in my ten gallon) so there is one left.

So if anyone can help me with further more advice, that would be great :)

Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
724 Posts
The scariest number to me in your list above is the nitrite. Both ammonia and nitrite should be at 0. Definitely do some more water changes, siphon any debris or decaying matter out of your substrate, make sure there's not too much decomposing gunk in your filter media and test your water every day. Hopefully the nitrite will go down. If not, you may need to beef up your biological filtration system or jump start things with some "Cycle Biological Water Conditioner." Making your water slightly more basic would probably be good too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
756 Posts
First test strips tend to suck and be inaccurate. Your nitrite should be 0 and your nitrate is safe up to 30-50. Maybe you reversed them on your post?

Second, angels, tetras, discus, corys...etc prefer acidic but soft water. Amazon water it naturally soft and acidic and these fish are all from there originally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The scariest number to me in your list above is the nitrite. Both ammonia and nitrite should be at 0. Definitely do some more water changes, siphon any debris or decaying matter out of your substrate, make sure there's not too much decomposing gunk in your filter media and test your water every day. Hopefully the nitrite will go down. If not, you may need to beef up your biological filtration system or jump start things with some "Cycle Biological Water Conditioner." Making your water slightly more basic would probably be good too
Hmm. On my chart it says that 20 is low. Meaning that it isn't a threat. Higher than 20 means that you would need to do water changes and so on..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First test strips tend to suck and be inaccurate. Your nitrite should be 0 and your nitrate is safe up to 30-50. Maybe you reversed them on your post?

Second, angels, tetras, discus, corys...etc prefer acidic but soft water. Amazon water it naturally soft and acidic and these fish are all from there originally.
Nope. I haven't reversed the charts. Seems like my angels, and Severums, and all my other fishes are doing well. I'll probably post up some pictures soon. I've made some new arrangements to my tank than before on my other threads that I have posted. My gouramis don't stay in my tank anymore, I no longer have freshwater puffers. Although my ten gallon tank has a lot of algae.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I might get new test strips.. they are not made in japan. They are made in the US so I don't know. The ones in japan are a lot different (brands made in here are better) because they have digital stuff. Like I could have bought this digital measure thing that I place in side my tank with water and all, and then it will tell me. I can put it in there for more than 3 yrs. At least 10 yrs max. It's just like a digital thermometers, but different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lol thanks :)

I usually bring my water to get tested every 1-2 weeks. I do water changes every week. So they always know that I am there. They always use drops. although they sold strips, they were trying to get rid of them because they have so many testing kits with drops that they can't put them all out. So a lot of people brought all of the strips so now they have enough room for the kits with drops.

So I know they usually would test my water for me, but they also said that if I bought the test kits myself, I will be able to do them myself and not waste as much time as walking 20 min all the way to the pet store. (people here barely drive...)

So yeah, I bought the test kits for ammonia and all... although I haven't finished using my test strips yet. So I will have to do that first. Then I will use the drops. (the drops don't expire until next year)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
Two big factors here:

1) Strips....loose em....you'll be glad you did.
2) nitrIte...anything over 0....bad. Your tank is in a cycle. Your fish may seem fine but have to be diligent and keep on the wc's. One thing I would recommend right off the bat is a 25% wc as soon as you get a chance.
 

·
Water Chemistry/ LiveBearer Specialist
Joined
·
343 Posts
I hope that your nitrite readings are off by about 20 ppm DarkRevoultions. Otherwise, all of your fish are dead and you are deluding yourself. Anywhere much above 0.25 ppm of nitrites becomes a serious threat to your fish and above 1.0 ppm is likely to result in death within a day or so. Nitrite works on fish much the same way that carbon monoxide works on people. If there is any present it starts to interfere with the ability of the fish to absorb oxygen in their circulatory system. They can suffocate when there is an excess of oxygen in their environment. As others have already said, you need a testing system that uses liquid reagents and test tubes. Until you have that, your readings will be viewed with at least some skepticism and maybe even disregarded. If your test strips were even close to being right, your fish would be swimming on the water surface trying very hard to get enough oxygen and would be dying off quickly. Your only option, with water parameters like your test strips suggest, would be hourly immense water changes of at least 70% of the water and pray that you could get 5 or more of those changes done before any fish died. Since your fish are alive, I must assume the test strips are badly wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I hope that your nitrite readings are off by about 20 ppm DarkRevoultions. Otherwise, all of your fish are dead and you are deluding yourself. Anywhere much above 0.25 ppm of nitrites becomes a serious threat to your fish and above 1.0 ppm is likely to result in death within a day or so. Nitrite works on fish much the same way that carbon monoxide works on people. If there is any present it starts to interfere with the ability of the fish to absorb oxygen in their circulatory system. They can suffocate when there is an excess of oxygen in their environment. As others have already said, you need a testing system that uses liquid reagents and test tubes. Until you have that, your readings will be viewed with at least some skepticism and maybe even disregarded. If your test strips were even close to being right, your fish would be swimming on the water surface trying very hard to get enough oxygen and would be dying off quickly. Your only option, with water parameters like your test strips suggest, would be hourly immense water changes of at least 70% of the water and pray that you could get 5 or more of those changes done before any fish died. Since your fish are alive, I must assume the test strips are badly wrong.
The readings for the nitrite has always been nearly 20 or under, and my fishes have been alive for years. I don't see why they aren't dead yet. I do weekly maintenance for my aquarium waters all the time, and I always do crucial water changes when needed. Especially when I had salt poisoning, and very low oxygen threat in my 29 gallon tank before. There are still a few fishes that have even survived my ammonia poisoning in my tank.

I'm sure my tank is in great condition, and my live plants always absorb nitrites, as so I have been told.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Two big factors here:

1) Strips....loose em....you'll be glad you did.
2) nitrIte...anything over 0....bad. Your tank is in a cycle. Your fish may seem fine but have to be diligent and keep on the wc's. One thing I would recommend right off the bat is a 25% wc as soon as you get a chance.
Then if I threw them away, that would be a waste of money don't you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
Then if I threw them away, that would be a waste of money don't you think?
well...if you are getting inaccurate results on your testing....which is more important...the loss of fishies or price of getting a better test kit? Ultimately it's your call of course. We're just offering friendly knowledgable advise. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
well...if you are getting inaccurate results on your testing....which is more important...the loss of fishies or price of getting a better test kit? Ultimately it's your call of course. We're just offering friendly knowledgable advise. :)
Oh I see :) Yeah, although I will still continue to use the test strips, but I don't have many left, so then after that I will use the better test kits that aren't strips. So then I will have better results :)

Thanks for the advice :)

Wow this forum has really nice people, unlike the aquaticcommunity forum. Has anyone ever been there?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
ok...I'll confess...I used the strips too at one point. Thought it was easier than using the drops and tubes. That and it was great to have a all-in-one tester. [ducks for cover]

Then I learned that weren't very accurate. As soon as they were gone, I went back to the individual testers. Peace of mind again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
ok...I'll confess...I used the strips too at one point. Thought it was easier than using the drops and tubes. That and it was great to have a all-in-one tester. [ducks for cover]

Then I learned that weren't very accurate. As soon as they were gone, I went back to the individual testers. Peace of mind again.
Lol, I am glad I am not the only one :) I'm glad that you also confess. So I am guessing that you learned from your mistakes? I am starting to learn from my mistakes now too, and I owe it all to you and to all of the others who helped me out with the test strips being a bad way to test water, and that different test kits are better :)

Thank you!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top