Aquarium Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got my 60 gal planted aquarium started (using some of the used substrate from my old 29 gallon cycled tank and Eco Complete substrate for the plants). Also used the usual 7.0 PH buffer product and chlorine, chloromine, ammonia detoxifiers for the tap water as well as about 15 gallons of "dirty water" from the old tank, the remainder of the water was conditioned from the tap. For the first two days the PH was 6.6. Now it has dropped off the radar of my Mardel in-tank gauge. The Mardel gauge for ammonia is also lett than 0 (usual for a starter tank). I have read a lot about letting the ph go through it's own balancing act with a new tank. Is there any way I can I work with adjusting alkalinity and water hardness to help balance the ph? BTW, I was advised that by using the old tank water, I could cycle the tank with my hardy fish from the old 29 gallon and I do have them in there. Thanks in advance for your help!:shakefish:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
you should test with a complete liquid test kit.... everything else is just to unrelaible.

What do you have in the tank any new diftwood. the tannins will cause the ph to drop and with new driftwood that has not been soaked before will release alot and be its a planted tank I going to say don't have an charcoal in the filter. Do a complete test on the tank water. pay close attention to the ammonia and nitrates and nitrites. If you ph falls to low it can kill those hardy fish you were talking about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No driftwood at all - bunch of aquarium store slate shards for making "caves". Did you say NO charcoal in the filter? I'm not sure I understood that part - I do have Black Diamond in the canister of the Magnum 350 Pro - is there a reason why I should remove the charcoal?
Thanks for the help!!:fish-in-a-bag:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
Yes, in planted tanks more so than just aquarium fish tanks. Charcoal absorbs impurities in the water and polishs the water...ie tannis, medcation copper etc. in planted tanks most people add some type of ferts, wether it be liquid or tablets these are also absorb, so you end up wasting your money. Also in canisters filters the you don't do a monthly breakdown of filter, as charcoal has a limit to what it will hold after it reachies that point it starts to leach back in the tank water. So if your using it to remove meds that you just treated you tank within a weeks time its leaching it back into the tank. If you read the direction on most medication the one of the first thing is says is to remove the charcoal from the filter before adding the meds. Charcoal is IMO really something you need to have on hand but not required to filter a tank. I do not run any filter with it unless it a new setup or I medicated the tank and need to remove it from the tank after its done it job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, , I am well aware of all that you wrote about medications, additives and charcoal etc... But my original question and request for advice was specifically PH issues- relative to the 60 gallon tank and situation I described n the first post. I very much appreciate your response, but it did not address the situation I need help with :{
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
your question as I read it was why your ph was falling...... Tannis will casue that I was tring to find out what you had in the tank.... than you asked why you should be using charcoal so I answer that question. whitout a complete water perams listed and not being there looking at a person tank than the only way to figure it out is to ask you questions. Would love to solve you problem with a quick answer but need to figure out what causing the problem to do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, and I explained that there was nothing in the tank that contained tannins -what I am looking for here is a conversation about other factors that influence PH such as carbonate, alkalinity etc... I have no ammonia readings as of yet (tank is only 3 days running), and, of course, at this stage too, I have zero on nitrates/nitrites. What I am needing help with is determining what I can do to balance alkalinity and carbonate to facilitate balanced PH. I think I asked about the baking soda and/or other solutions, but there was nothing about it in your response. I do very much appreciate your taking the time, but you went on a tangent about charcoal, which isn't what I'm looking for :)
 

·
fishboydanny
Joined
·
584 Posts
Crushed coral is good for raising pH. In my new tanks, i've found that first the pH drops, then ammonia, etc, before the cycle is complete. maybe crushed coral is your solution. use one of those filter bags, so you can remove the coral if need be.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Watertiger

·
Pleco n bn breeder n BOSS
Joined
·
7,685 Posts
With the tank still cycling I wouldn't mess with the ph. Wait until after the cycle to adjust it to what you want. During a cycle the ph can change a bit both ways so if you mess with it now when the cycle ends your ph could still be different than the way you want it. When cycling is done you can adjust it.

With the crushed coral, Just start out with a little as it could make it go higher than what you want. Baking soda will change your gh which will in turn change the ph. (think thats right, to early in the am) might be the kh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This is more what I am looking for - thank you. The Tank was started with some of the substrate from the old cycled tank, also used the decorations from the old tank and about 25% of the water was from the old cycled tank too. Maybe I should leave this to work itself out dring the first 2-3 weeks? Will baking soda assist with water hardness because I think this may be part of the issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How much baking soda is safe to use to balance gh? My tank is 60 gallons. Thanks so much for the practical and helpful responses!! My gut feeling is that the water hardness is the culprit!!
 

·
Pleco n bn breeder n BOSS
Joined
·
7,685 Posts
Can you give us your kh and gh readings. Using baking soda, I would just do a little at a time, after a couple of hours test your ph, add a little more if needed. You can do this until you reach the point you want. Write it down so you can keep track of how much you are using, Then you can adjust as needed during water changes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
Baking Soda will adjust the KH..... a half tablespoon will raise you KH one degree. but what it does to you PH is to make rise instantly.... if my PH 6.5 and I add baking soda it goes up to PH 8.0 +. I'm would not advise a you to do it, because you can kill any fish you have in the tank if you don't know what your doing. As stated before during the cycling process at first your Ph will drop before the cycling really get going. So you should just wait and let the tank balance out naturally before you think have a problem.
You should never try and adjust you tank water in the tank,if you must play with it do it in a bucket, in a 5 gal works will becuase the math to tranfer you results to the tank.

Also with 60 gal of water and depending on the number of fish you have in the tank it my take a while to build up ammonia enought to get a reading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ran out of testing strips for the kh and gh - will be going to the store as soon as it opens today. Thanks so much, I'll write back when I have the readings!

Is there a particular brand of testing kit that you recommend?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
get a "complete freshwater testing kit" and also you should get a liquid KH and GH test kit if you are going to mess with the water, the complete kit doesn't do KH or GH, this will give a nice water testing kit. Test strips are unreliable as stated before, they are effected by humity in the air and other factors once air hit s them. Even if sealed properly every time you get one air new air touch the reagents. The liquids will cost more but you also can test you water many more time than strips. So in simple terms you will be buying a can of strips every month, to one liquid kit that you can use for 2 years and the results more accurate, IMO a better buy and better equipment for aquarium, very cost effective.
 

·
fishboydanny
Joined
·
584 Posts
I agree with djrichie. In the past four years i've lived here, i've only needed to replace the liquid tests once; i swear by them
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top