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Of primary concern to the aquarist is management of the biological waste produced by an aquarium's inhabitants. Fish, invertebrates, fungi, and some bacteria excrete nitrogen waste in the form of ammonia (which will convert to ammonium, in acidic water) and must then pass through the nitrogen cycle. Ammonia is also produced through the decomposition of plant and animal matter, including fecal matter and other detritus. Nitrogen waste products become toxic to fish and other aquarium inhabitants at high concentrations.[
 

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Im a bit confused by the purpose of the post but Ill try to give a more in depth view at the nitrogen cycle in a marine environment. Whenever there is waste produced from either die off (LR exposed to air to long or inhabitants) which is consumed by various types of nitrifying bacteria. Each type of bacteria consumes as the cycle progresses and the three major components are ammonia (NH^3/NH^3+4 which depends on the pH of the water and the NH^3 unionized is less toxic than the ionized state NH^3+4), Nitrite (NO^2) and finally Nitrate (NO^3). This process starts with the ammonia produced from the waste and is consumed by the nitrifying bacteria, this bacteria then is consumed by the nitrite phase of the nitrogen cycle and ends with nitrates. During the Ammonia phase, the waste is consumed the ammonia increases. Ammonia is very funny though because its toxicity is dependent upon the pH of the water. If the pH is lower (7.8ish) then BOTH the ionized and unionized would be less lethal to the inhabitants. However at 8.4 that most of us run reefs at, even the unionized ammonia is lethal. In all marine environments NH^3 and NO^2 are highly toxic to inhabitants and I in NO WAY ever suggest putting anything living in a tank while cycling. It burns the gills of fish and is cruel. The same can be accomplish through live rock or even a small piece of shrimp to kick start the cycle. Now moving on to the trites, during this phase the nitrifiying bacteria (nitrosomonas) convert the ammonia into nitrite which begin to build. This phase usually takes a week to 10 days to complete and there is usually a significant spike a few days into the nitrite phase. Finally we move onto nitrates which the nitrifying bacteria (nitrobacters) break the nitrites down into nitrates which will continue to build in levels in your tank. For you FO people out there nitrates are little issue for you if you have an at all reasonable water change schedule. With this being said nitrates above 15-20ppm can begin to cause problems for invert in molting as well as causing some corals to be more susceptible to illness or inability to recover from injury as quickly. A produce such as bioballs (unless properly maintenance and cleaned bi-weekly) can help to add to this issue and LR rubble does a better job in its place. This is still a fairly simplistic explanation but hopefully it will help someone out there! Best of luck and Happy Reefing!
 

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Of primary concern to the aquarist is management of the biological waste produced by an aquarium's inhabitants. Fish, invertebrates, fungi, and some bacteria excrete nitrogen waste in the form of ammonia (which will convert to ammonium, in acidic water) and must then pass through the nitrogen cycle. Ammonia is also produced through the decomposition of plant and animal matter, including fecal matter and other detritus. Nitrogen waste products become toxic to fish and other aquarium inhabitants at high concentrations.[

And your saying what?
 
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