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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The last aquarium we had was about 10 months ago.It was 55gal saltwater,and we had good luck with it.After I became disabled I was not able to maintain it as needed,so we took it down.About a month ago we cleaned it all up,and set it up for freshwater.The only thing we used from the saltwater setup was the tank,lights,and heater.
We are using 2 large hang on filters with Activated Carbon filters.There are no live plants.We have 1 large air stone and 2 air operated ornaments.
Fish are 5 Tetras,1 Albino Rainbow Shark,3 small Angel Fish,1 large Snail,3 smaller Snails, 2 small Ghost Shrimp.

Now to my question;I am sure this has been ask several times,so forgive me.
We set up the tank,and left it for about 2 weeks before putting anything in it.The water was clear the entire time,with no fish in it.My daughter had a Bata that she wanted to put in,so we did.The Bata was in the tank over night,the next morning the water was milky,and has been milky since with no change.Can someone give me some help?

Thanks,God bless,Keith
 

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I am pretty sure that it is a bacteria boom because you didnt cycle it. am i right?this is also known as new tank syndrome and to cure it you can do several things.you can cycle the tank and hope for the best of your betta or take the betta out and cycle it the right way.do you know what cycling the tank means? Srry if i sound mean
 

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Cornelius
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It does sound like a bacteria bloom. I am assuming a beginner knowledge level in the descriptions below. Nothing personal, just best to get the info out.

Bacteria blooms are usually caused by one of two things.

First is a lack of beneficial bacteria, which get built up during the initial tank cycle and feed on fish waste. A very large water change can reduce the beneficial bacteria to a point that this can occur even after a tank cycle.

Second is fish food. Severely overfeeding or feeding a fish food with a lot of fats or oils can cause this. Anything more then 8% fats is generally considered as a suspect for a bacteria bloom. Generally not overnight though.

You said you are running activated carbon already, that will help. Do your filters have a bio media, like the bio wheels?

I recommend removing the beta, doing small water changes, 10% or less every few days, and waiting for the beneficial bacteria to get built up enough to solve the problem for you. Even small water changes are debatable because you are removing good bacteria as well as bad each time. Get a test kit and keep checking the water for Nitrate and Nitrite levels. Watch for the Nitrite levels to fall towards zero, the water conditions should improve. A good sign that things are working will be a spike in the Nitrate levels, indicating the beneficial bacteria are hard at work.
 

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Pleco n bn breeder n BOSS
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On top of the betta there is also other fish.

Fish are 5 Tetras,1 Albino Rainbow Shark,3 small Angel Fish,1 large Snail,3 smaller Snails, 2 small Ghost Shrimp.

You are going to need to do daily water changes just to keep the fish alive, unless you can take them back till the tank cycles as it is going to harm the fish and will shorten their lives considerably.

Do you have test kits? at least tests for ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. You will need to test these daily for awhile and when ever ammonia reaches .25 do a water change. Then when you get 0 readings for ammonia you will be having readings for nitrites. At .25 do a water change. These two are toxic to fish. Once nitrites get to 0 and you start getting readings for nitrates you can cut back on water changes to at least once a week. Don't let your nitrates get above 20. Your tank will be cycled then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well as I said in my introduction,and I should have stated here,I am very much a newbie when it comes to aquariums.As far as thinking that someone is being mean,well,I outgrew getting my feelings hurt a long time ago.I do welcome any advice that anyone can give.
As far as the Bata is concerned,well,my daughter wanted a frog,so I put the frog in with the Bata........just say the Bata did not last long.I removed the frog,and I have listed the fish I now have in our tank.I do not know what cycling the tank means,or how to go about doing this.Do I need to remove all the fish.I'll say again,although my wife and I have had an aquarium on and off for near 20 years,I still say I am new.I have never did it the right way,so I am willing to learn.I may ask a few stupid questions.Just explain it the best way you can and I'll do my best to understand.
This is a great site

Thanks,for any help,God bless,Keith
 

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Cycling the tank is a need for aquariums.this is also known as the nitrogen cycle in nature.i wont go that much in depth but you are trying to establish a colony of beneficial bacteria to decompose or eat the waste and extra food that is left from the tank inhabitants.the bacteria in other words is eating the bad amonia which is deadly to the fish.this is what kills the fish in uncycled tanks.when it is cycled it means that the tank has enough bacteria to hold fish.btw if you get live plants they will help cycle the tank and they are always beneficial to fish by giving them extra oxygen

Hop this helps... Ask more questions if needed?
 
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