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Discussion Starter #1
I have what I think is an amazon sword, not sure which one. When I bought it, it had oval leaves on long stems.

All the new leaves have short stems and long leaves, that are no longer oval. There are no other known problems with the plant.

The plant is growing very well. This is a 20 gallon (which I know is small tank for a sword, but I plan on trimming it regularly). I use fertilizer tabs, no CO2 and have 30 watts.

Is the changing shape of the leaves something I need to be concerned about and is there anything I can do to get the plant to grow the way it was when I bought it?

Pat
 

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I've got the exact same thing. Long stems with oval leaves when I got it, now the new growth is long and narrow. Mine is an Echinodorus Belheri. I don't think anything's wrong with it, I'm expecting the leaves to grow out and round up maybe
 

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Most likely the swords were grown with the leaves out of water, and its reverting to its submerged form.
Exactly...They are grown in a terranium type of setup to speed up growth and remove algae from the equation. Now that they are submerged they require more light/nutrients, so they have shorter stems and more leaf to increase their surface area.

What I usually do with new plants is 2 things:

1.) Cut off almost all their leaves (except stem plants)

2.) Cut their roots very short

This promotes fast growth of roots, and new leaves that are for submerged growth. I would cut off some of your old leaves if possible.
 

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Exactly...They are grown in a terranium type of setup to speed up growth and remove algae from the equation. Now that they are submerged they require more light/nutrients, so they have shorter stems and more leaf to increase their surface area.

What I usually do with new plants is 2 things:

1.) Cut off almost all their leaves (except stem plants)

2.) Cut their roots very short

This promotes fast growth of roots, and new leaves that are for submerged growth. I would cut off some of your old leaves if possible.
Since I'm using a 20-gal, I'm already pruning older leaves whenever they get in the way...that is when the arch downward and cover up other plants. Since this is what I always planned on doing, I have no problem doing it faster than I had first intended.

The plant probably has an equal number of new leaves as old now with new leaves coming in very rapidly now. The root system too is very extensive...I have a glass bottom on a framed stand so I can easily check out what's going on under the rocks.

One thing I've noticed is that the more I prune, the faster the plant puts out new leaves and the faster the other leaves grow. It's becoming a very nice plant, but different looking than I wanted. Live and learn.
 

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Keep in mind it is always going to have a wide shady area under it...especially if you let the leaves fold over a bit. You can use this to your advantage by placing shady loving plants under the sword plant. Plants like anubius nanas or java ferns would be perfect.

The shade would force them to branch out faster and keep them from growing green spot algae. If you decide to add either of these species, do not bury the tuber and if you cut slits in the tuber, you will get more leaflets. ;)

BTW we would love to see a pic of your tank. It sounds like it is coming along nicely.
 
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