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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I am new to these boards. I actually never posted here and I am only posting here because of my fish. He's got like these two little hairy/fuzzy kind of patches on him and his mouth looks all red and like infected and inflammated. I have tried adding stress coat, stress zyme, and Pimafix antifungal fish remedy. His mouth is really bad and I'd like to try to at least lessen the effect of it if anything. The water is clean, the pH and amonia levels are good.

Anyone know what else I can try here?

Thank you and appreciate it

Seyz
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here are some pics of the fish. He is actually quite old(at the VERY least 3+ years) and has been around for a while. It's a gouramie that I need help with.

see that white ball of whatever on the fish in the upper right of him, that SHOULDN'T BE THERE :(
http://img239.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65117_362_122_577lo.JPG

more white ball and here you can see how bad its MOUTH is
http://img143.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65103_364_122_745lo.JPG

white ball and look at the mouth
http://img7.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65110_363_122_726lo.JPG

some red dots on it
http://img105.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65119_360_122_436lo.JPG
 

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after looking at you pictures and thank you for them it makes it alot easier her what I feel your fish has

Common Names:
Bacterial mouth rot
Cotton wool disease
Flexibacter columnaris
Mouth fungus
Salinity: Freshwater

Description:
This is a bacterial ailment caused by the flexibacter columnaris bacterium .Identified in 1922 Commonly mistaken for a fungal infection because of the characteristic cotton tufts at the infection site. The common names reflect this misidentification. The tufts are caused by the filamentous structure of the bacteria. This an almost omnipresent bacterium in aquaria, and usually only infects those fish suffering from injuries, weakened but other diseases, and dietary deficiencies. Its growth and spread once a foothold is established can be radical. Deaths within 24 hours have been reported especially when the infection site is a pre-existing deep wound. Once this bacteria reaches the bloodstream the condition of the fish will worsen significantly. Usual cases will if untreated debilitate fish to the point of death within two weeks. Optimum growth is acheived at 28-35c, and consequently is a common and seriously prevalent disease in aquaculture. All species of freshwater fish are susceptible to this disease. Primary sites of infection are the mouth, fin and gill edges , although not limited purely to these locations. In severe cases it can cover the entire body of a fish. Infections near the gill area are particularly deadly as infection stimulates the production of plaques on the gill tissue,and this reduces oxgen exchange, and the production of permanent scar tissue may mean the fish is damaged for life. Specimens with severe gill infections rarely survive, and die from suffocation. Sometimes an affected fish may show circular lesions instead of fluffy growths. It is a severe ailment, at any level. Very progressive, and when one fish is affected in community it will act as a breeding ground that will ensure even other healthy fish will eventually be overcome by infections.

Symptoms:
Wounds
Faded_Colours
Clamped_Fins
Loss_of_Appetite
Loss_of_Equilibrium
Cloudy_Eyes
Rubbing_on_Objects
Cotton_Tufts
Damaged_Fins
Patches

Treatment:
Furanace (available in FURAN brand medications) is the only truly effective treatment for both internal and external symptoms of columnaris. Other medications that are effective externally include oxytetracycline, and sulfamerazine administered as long term aquaria treatments.Dipping treatments include copper sulfate,oxolinic acid and potassium permanganate although these will only be effective at the early stages of infection. The lack of treatments able to treat the condition internally are one of the reasons so many keepers fail in attempting to beat this problem, suffering repeated bouts of fluffy grows, and often eventual debilitation and death of the fish even when external symptoms have subsided.Again it is worth reiterating that only furan treats this condition internally as well as externally.

Comments:
A common bacterium , and a common secondary infection, this is one of the most prevalent aquarium killers, and is much misunderstood, misdiagnosed and often mistreated ailment. Treatment must be aggressive and persistant until all traces of infection are eliminated. Allowed to persist , it will wipe out an aquarium population, including all species of fish. This is also a major killer of wild fish , and as such there must be no increased risk of it reaching watercourses. Dispose of all dead specimens of infected fish either by burning, or correct medical disposal. While flexibacter columnaris is almost omnipresent in aquaria and water bodies above 10c around the world, corpses represent a significant agent of high level transmission, and should be disposed of with the utmost care.
 

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Common Names:
Achlyaiasis
Cloud eye
Finrot
Fungal infection
Fungus
Mycosis
Saprolegnia
Saprolegniasis

Description:
The fungal family Saprolegnia, and related families are responsible for a whole range of afflictions. I will refer to fungal infections here inclusively, because despite the many possible fungal infections at large, from the diagnosis and treatment point of view there are so many similarities that many can be treated even if regarded collectively. Fungal infections take many shapes , symptoms include white fluff and fur on the body and any part of the eternal anatomy, to slimy patches and cloudy eyes.Fins will begin to recede in many cases, gills also , are extremely vulnerable. Patches of skin in serious infections may fall way exposing reddish wounds and bare flesh. Fungal infections can promote colour changes in most fish, from patches through to complete blanching of colour on the entire body. Saprolegnia strains are basically omnipresent in freshwater environments and can spring up in fish kept in less than adequete water conditions, often making a beeline for ammonia damaged gill tissue and dead slime layers on fish. Any fish with a reduced immune system or injury may contract a fungal infection, and fish eggs are susceptible. Corpses in the tank and uneaten foods will be a magnet for saprolegnia strains, and will radically increase the chances of fish in the same aquaria being infected. Many fungal infections are resistant to treatment, and likely to remerge if rigorous hygeine is not taken seriously. Many fungi may necessitate the fishkeeper trying a number of medications before finding one an effective treatment.Fungal infection vary widely in their potential to cause damage. Some fish live with peripheral infections all their lives while other can succumb within days, suffering all the effects of necrosis and septacaemia , as the fungus may aid the invasion of various bacterial strains into the body. Flexibacter Columnaris is often associated with fungal infections, and it may in some cases be prudent to treat the fish for both conditions. It is very difficult for the inexperienced fishkeeper to differentiate between saprolegnia and columnaris infections.

Symptoms:
Bleeding
Gasping
Wounds
Faded_Colours
Clamped_Fins
Bulging_Eyes
Loss_of_Appetite
Pitted_Skin
Cloudy_Eyes
Rubbing_on_Objects
Cotton_Tufts
Extruded_Scales
Damaged_Fins
Patches

Treatment:
A wide range of effective treatments are available for these very common infections. A typical and effective choice would be malachite green, but there are literally hundreds of "off the shelf" treatments available that contain malachite green that a fishkeeper may take advantage of. Sulphur based topical treatments and dips are also effective although they can be very hard on the fish.In mild cases, or cases caught early on , medications like pimafix are effective. Some fishkeepers kill minor infections with short salt baths. None of the saprolegnia species that infect freshwater fish can cross the osmotic barrier and are killed bu high levels of salt. Marine fish have their own fungal species.

Comments:
Almost every fishkeeper will encounter the saprolegnia complex fungi at some time in the course of their hobby. Many fishkeepers keep a ready stock of medications just in case of an outbreak, as treatment is incredibly successful if administered early enough, often requiring no more than a one -off treatment. The main thing to remember is that if your "fungus" is progressing very fast indeed and the fish is not responding to antifungals, then you must remember that your fish may have contracted a Flexibacter Columnaris infection, and the course of treatment must either be changed to reflect that bacterial cause or you can treat both ailments at the same time. Meds are available that will treat both.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey thank you very much for the hasty reply! I just have two things I am concered with.

Your post says that it will "quickly" take out(kill) a tank. That fish has had stuff like that probably for a good 4+ months. It has gotten worse in that time though. I have another gouramie and a neon tetra and they both look good.

Furanace would definitely be the best thing. Where can I pick that up? Will a Petland have it? Also, even if my fish doesn't have the bacterial mouth rot will Furanace probably heal it?

Thank you much for the reply. I am new to fish tank problems on my own.
 

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Will you will have to ask you LFS if they have it if the can get it...... as far as instant death, it was more that the the fish will spread the disease, by eating the dead fish in the tank. So treat the complete tank... remember to remove the charcoal whenever you treat a tank.
 
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