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Frank1971
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, I could use some advice.

I have an 80 gallon tank that I have no room for in my house, but have plenty of room in my garage. The temperatures where I live range from the high 90's to the low teens during the winter. I was thinking of setting up a goldfish/koi fish tank. But, I'm worried about the far ranging temperatures where I live. I'm not overally worried with the heat, living in a part of the country where the summers are mild. But just wondering about the winters, whether dropping temps into the teens and single digits is too low for Koi fish. I know they can live in ponds in quite low temps, but just wondering if the dynamics of a fish tank are different. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks
 

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i need another tank.
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koi can grow big so i think that a pond is better then a tank(my opinion)
ok,if you want to keep the koi in the 80 gallon tank,then you should get a 55 gallon tank and keep in in the house and use it for goldfish.then in the winter move the koi inside to the 55 gallon.
i hope this helps:)if you do it this way then you have a reason to get another fish tank:)
 

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Years ago I took my koi out of my pond and placed them in a horse watering trough in the barn. I surrounded each side with hay bales and kept a light on them on one side of the trough. On the other side (top) I kept a board with
another hay bale on it. Technically, it did get pretty cold, but it never froze and we get temps down to zero here in the winter. Now I have them in the pond
15 X 15 X 3 1/2 feet all year round. I keep the pond pump and filter going and even when the temps go below zero and it freezes there is always a small part that doesn't.... Ponds are definitely better than tanks (again, my opinion) and it's less work when done right! Good luck.
 

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The pond needsto be deeper than 3 to 5 feet or whatever the frost line is in your area. The lowest part must also accomodate the size of the bodies of the fish. In the coldest part of winter they go down to the bottom and hibernate. They are cold blooded animals and their bodies respond to the tempreture around them. They do not feed, or move at all.
Ice is not as dangerous to pond fish as the lack of oxygen under the pond surface. Airation will prevent winter kill due to thick ice and snow. It also oxygenates the water, and moves the water so it does not freeze. I do not know the cost of such a system or the size of your pond. This might be a path you can investigate.
 
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