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aquariumkids.com
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Hi all --

I'm looking for some freshwater fish that would be good for a first-time breeder. I have a fully-cycled 29-gallon tank and would like to try my hand at breeding. What are some good fish that will breed relatively easy, but not overpopulate? Also, the parents and fry should be able to be in the same tank without cannibalism occurring. What are my options?

Thanks in advance! - Evan
 

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Stay away from guppies, platies and mollies - you'll be over run in no time. Maybe try apistogramma of which there are many species. I've had the apisto cacatuoides, but there were issues with aggression. The first female ultimately harrassed the male to death. Multiple females may be better, but I didn't pursue these.

Another to consider are the kribensis. Here's a nice article on them

Kribensis: The river rainbows | Features | Practical Fishkeeping
 

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If you want to have an interesting offspring action, they take Nanacara anomala.
It is brood care a prime example of dwarf cichlids. It's easy. Everyone should have done it once.
If you want to produce juvenile fish, then take some couples Red Rio.
(H. flammeus). That's easy.
 

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On the wild side
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Some cichlids are relatively easy to breed, and mouth brood. I do not know a lot of these fish, but basic types you can get at any LFS/petstore can breed in your tank and raise their fry. Also, bristlenose plecos are about as easy as it gets, if you dont want over run then just seperate the pair.
 

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Convicts are probably the easiest cichlid to breed, and most LFS will take any babies you dont want for yourself.
 

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Suffers from TMT syndrome
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Some cichlids are relatively easy to breed, and mouth brood. I do not know a lot of these fish, but basic types you can get at any LFS/petstore can breed in your tank and raise their fry. Also, bristlenose plecos are about as easy as it gets, if you dont want over run then just seperate the pair.
Just out of curiosity, would a 29 gallon be big enough for breeding BNs? I thought they needed bigger for breeding because of their bioloads. I'm about to get a mated pair, which is why I'm asking.
 

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Agree with what susan said :)
 
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