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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everybody!!

I am new to the site and somewhat new to aquarium keeping. I've had my 16gallon bowfront up and running for a week now and am ready to add some fish. I did some water tests last night and everything (ph, nitrate & nitrite) was within the desired levels.

So, I was at a fish store last weekend and picked out some fish I would like to have. I am looking for advice on which of these can live comfortably together and which might be best to be the first fish in my tank.

Powder Blue Gourami
Neon Tetra
Cory Reticulatus
Angel Fish
Rainbow or Bala Shark
Ghost Shrimp
 

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You will have an issue with the Angels and sharks. Little Neon's and ghosties will be picked off one by one.

Bala's will get rather large as well 16g is not suitable for Angels.

Sry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You will have an issue with the Angels and sharks. Little Neon's and ghosties will be picked off one by one.

Bala's will get rather large as well 16g is not suitable for Angels.

Sry.
So, are you saying the Angels and Sharks will have a problem with each other or that they'll be the one's picking off the neons and shrimps?
 

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first of all...i dont want to sound mean or demanding...bala sharks and angelfish are highly suggested for 50 gallon and up...except for the angelfish which can live in 30 gallon tanks with optimal conditions...btw bala sharks and any other type of shark are to be kept with aggressive fish only(barbs)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think we've made up our minds. We ended up with a few Red/Blue Honey Gouramis. They should be fine when we add some neon tetras in a few weeks. After that probably a cory and a plecostomas to finish off our tank.
 

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just make sure that you get a couple of cories...not just one because they need to be in groups
 

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OP Do you know what the nitrogen cycle is? Just because you have had a tank set up for a few days doesn't make it ready to go. Unless you have used seeded filter material it usually takes a month or so to get a tank cycled. Even if you did use seeded filter material if there are no fish in it now the bacteria will likely have not survived and will need to be cycled again. If the tank is cycled disregard this but if not do a search on the nitrogen cycle before you add any fish. Im not sure what kind of test kit you are using but if the tank was empty when you tested the water it likely wont test for nitrites or nitrates. Once you add ammonia (pure, or fish waste etc) and the tank processes the ammonia to 0 and 0 nitrites then you are ready for fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
OP Do you know what the nitrogen cycle is? Just because you have had a tank set up for a few days doesn't make it ready to go. Unless you have used seeded filter material it usually takes a month or so to get a tank cycled. Even if you did use seeded filter material if there are no fish in it now the bacteria will likely have not survived and will need to be cycled again. If the tank is cycled disregard this but if not do a search on the nitrogen cycle before you add any fish. Im not sure what kind of test kit you are using but if the tank was empty when you tested the water it likely wont test for nitrites or nitrates. Once you add ammonia (pure, or fish waste etc) and the tank processes the ammonia to 0 and 0 nitrites then you are ready for fish.
I do now. Unfortunately this is after I killed 5 of the first 6 fish I put in the aquarium.

How long does it take for the tank to process the ammonia back to 0? It's been about 10 days now that I've been getting ammonia readings ranging from .25 - .50 and I've been swapping 2 gallons out of my 16 gallon tank every day. I've also been using Aqueon Ammonia Neutralizer and the ammonia levels don't seem to be dropping at all.
 

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A good fish to use to help cycle the aquarium are danios. Fairly entertaining anda good community fish, they can suvive while the tank cycles.
You may be adding ammonia via your tap water, rather than reducing. Changing water frequently on a non-cycled tank serves to disrupt the cycle. Buy a half dozen danios and let the tank go for a month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A good fish to use to help cycle the aquarium are danios. Fairly entertaining anda good community fish, they can suvive while the tank cycles.
You may be adding ammonia via your tap water, rather than reducing. Changing water frequently on a non-cycled tank serves to disrupt the cycle. Buy a half dozen danios and let the tank go for a month.
Wouldn't the ammonia neutralizer be taking care of the ammonia in the tap water?
 

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Wouldn't the ammonia neutralizer be taking care of the ammonia in the tap water?
First off, I have the exact same tank as I needed a small footprint. There are some things you need to know about the nitrogen cycle. First, NEVER EVER use chemicals to neutralize ammonia, or nitrite! This will make it impossible for you to cycle your tank. Why is this important? It means that waste will never decompose, plus how could putting so many chemicas be good for your tank?

2nd, use fish like giant danios to cycle. They are tough sobs and extremely fun fish. Just don't keep them after your cycle as they do require more room.

3rd, If you got the bow front starter kit, please, please, please get a real filter. The plastic one they give you has no space to sustain bacteria. The Hagen aqua clear is good, the bio wheel ones are good, and the fluval ones are good too.

4th, I know everybody says do small water changes, but I found this to be a detriment as it actually removes beneficial bacteria from the tank.

5th, don't go to petsmart. It may cost more to go to a specialty petstore, but it will save you time and heartache in the end as the advice, often healthier and younger fish, and support they may offer is way better. The only trick to finding one is going in and looking.

I hope this may help you as I was in the same place 3 months ago. Also, go read about cycling.
 

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5th, don't go to petsmart. It may cost more to go to a specialty petstore, but it will save you time and heartache in the end as the advice, often healthier and younger fish, and support they may offer is way better. The only trick to finding one is going in and looking.
I have to disagree. After talking with the people at Petsmart and finding out when they get their fish shipments, I can always find rather hardy fish when I come by a day before their next shipment. My local Petsmart gets theirs on Wednesdays, so I'll come by on a Tuesday to see if there's any good deals.

I've had issues before finding out that bit of info, but after that (and understanding cycling a bit more), I haven't had a single fish die on me since.
 

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Maybe I am jus spoiled where i live, but the fish that i get at sociality stores look better and are cheaper than the petsmarts here.
 

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Specialty stores are usually cheaper and more helpful than petsmart, petco, etc for the same reason every other small business has to compete with larger corporations. They would not be able to last otherwise because the average person's mentality in this society trusts famous brand names.

While it certainly can't be stated that all petco/petsmart/etc are the worse, individual specialty pet stores are generally more knowledgeable and cheaper.

I don't know how large the gourami's grow, but I would suggest that the fish you pick not exceed past 3 inches in their adulthood considering the size of your small tank.

Neons should be in groups of at least 5, I believe the same should be said of corys.
 
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