Aquarium Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Over the years I have had several tanks and many kinds of fish. My favorites are the Betta and the Corydora. My next project is a South American biotope with only Cories. How many can I put in a 20 gal. long tank? Also, I read in a book about filtration that a reverse-flow undergravel system is recommended to reduce the amount of bacteria in the substrate which can damage their barbels. Wouldn't the upward flow of water disrupt their eating habits at the bottom? Any ideas? Does anyone have a recommendation as to what filter is best for catfish?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,108 Posts
I collected Cories! I had quite a few different kinds. I worked at a fish store and whenever shipments would come in I would very often find a hitchhiking Corydora, oftentimes a type I had never seen before. There's so many, I forget the number off the top of my head, but there's a lot of common ones and even more that are rare or hardly seen in the hobby.
Ask your LFS (lfs stands for local fish store) to set them aside for you and to call you whenever they get odd ones, surely if they don't collect them themselves they would be happy to. They occasionally came mixed in the S. American shipments with neons and other tetras and such, sometimes there would be an interesting cory that made it into the shipment!

I always kept mine in the same planted aquarium at the time. I used a mixture of natural river rock gravel mixed with Seachem's substrate called Flourite. They complimented each other very well in the tank and the Corydoras seemed to never have a problem with their barbs as it smoothed out nicely. It was planted and had no undergravel filter. I would siphon it out occasionally, however (but never scrub it!).

I highly doubt the bacteria in the gravel would damage their barbels! Thats pretty much unheard of.. Also, the upward flow could certainly disrupt the natural gravitation that draws the food to where they forage. I would disregard that suggestion.
The cories like moderate lighting, perhaps some pieces of driftwood positioned as a shelter they could hide behind or inside of to reduce stress.
In your 20 gallon long tank you could perhaps keep a dozen or so, give or take, depending on their size. Make sure the tank is established with enough good bacteria before you load it up, and add the catfish slowly, not all at once. Build up the school over time perhaps. Monitor your ammonia and nitrite levels and if they ever rise, you'll know that you have an overstocked tank and the bio filter cannot keep up. Do your water changes regularly and adding live plants would perhaps help the water quality as well. If your levels stay at undetectable levels, you're fine.

Also, when you buy them, look very carefully at the school of them in the tank, you can oftentimes find an oddball mixed in, some color morph or different species mixed in with the others. Check the tanks in the fish store carefully and you might be surprised what you find. I found a lot of very interesting and unique Corydoras this way back in the 90's. And don't feel bad asking the salesperson to cherry pick the exact one you want. Watch the tank for a few minutes and locate the star fish you want to take home with you. Best regards
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top