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Hi I'm usually in the saltwater forums but I need to ask this question for my sister. do cichlids require a low saltwater or are they freshwater ? I know they are not like my reef tank but someone told her to buy kosher salt and add 1 cup a week for 3 weeks. I don't know anything about these fish so I figured I'd ask here. she has a 55 gal tank. she added 1 cup of the salt yesterday and she says they are acting weird so she's did a water change tonite. hopefully they will be ok
Please help
 

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Hi I'm usually in the saltwater forums but I need to ask this question for my sister. do cichlids require a low saltwater or are they freshwater ? I know they are not like my reef tank but someone told her to buy kosher salt and add 1 cup a week for 3 weeks. I don't know anything about these fish so I figured I'd ask here. she has a 55 gal tank. she added 1 cup of the salt yesterday and she says they are acting weird so she's did a water change tonite. hopefully they will be ok
Please help


African Cichilids are a fresh water fish. You should however add some aquarium salt to the water. I use Seachem Cichilid Lake Salt. The amount of salt depends on the species you have. If you use this brand they recommend the following; Lake Tanganyika 1.5 Teaspoons per 10 Gallons, Malawi & Victoria 1/2 teaspoons per. 10 gallons.

They also requre a higher PH 7.5-8.5 depending on the species, temp. 76-78 & love water movement/circulation.
 

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I have both African (Frantosas), a South American (Red Oscar), and a Blood Parrot Cichlids. I have not needed to use extra salt in my tanks. What type of Cichlid does she have?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
she did a 50 % water change and they seem to be fine now. not sure what kind she has I do know they're not oscars. one is big and fat and orange and has a funny looking mouth its cute. and the other 3 are i think midas cichlids ( thats what i could find from pics online
 

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That's good to hear. The Orange one sounds like a Blood Parrot Cichlid. I love mine.

 

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dankest chef u wont meet
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I had a cichlid tank for a few years and I never once put salt in it. I just kept my pH higher than freshwater. But there's different types of cichlids, and certain species need a higher pH than others. But no, I would not use salt
 

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cichlidaholic
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Salts really aren't going to be needed, and unless your mixing your own cichlid buffer recipe, only aquarium salts should be used. Kosher salt is basicly sodium chloride and not good for the fish .

If needed you can add cichlid buffers which do contain various salts in the proper proportions, however you'd need to have some info on just what fish you have and what your current water parameters are before using them.
 

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No. Do not add At unless you are treating for disease or infection. Cichlids are fresh water fish.

The other thing that needs to be addressed is the stock. You should have your sister pick her favorite fish, and find homes for the rest. A si gle Midas will need that 55 to itself in the long run.
 

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cichlidaholic
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Actually a midas could easily take a 125 all to itself when full grown and would be quite cramped and stunted in a 55. Whats really needed is positive IDs on the stock. If the OP could post a few pics it would help.
 

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Actually a midas could easily take a 125 all to itself when full grown and would be quite cramped and stunted in a 55. Whats really needed is positive IDs on the stock. If the OP could post a few pics it would help.
I'm not sure who gave you such information, but unfortunately someone lied ro you.

As a Midas will likely grow to 11-12", a 75g tank will be suitable for life. Obviously a larger tank is always better, however it is absolutely not a requirement.
Also, though not preferred, it is possible to keep your Midas perfectly happy and healthy in a 55g with proper filtration and maintenance. It will require more work, but if its all you have and you are willing to put in the extra effort, your 55 will be ok for a single specimen and will not be stunted at all. But remember, the bigger tank you can provide, the better.
 

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cichlidaholic
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I owned one untill recently and have seen several that were well in excess of your rather low end estimate. This species routinely exceeds that .

A 55 barely provides enough room for a mature Midas to turn around . It's equivilent to you living in a closet for life. Sure it can be done, but why do it? A 75 is better but still only provides a little more turning room . Once you get past the 4' tank barrier , you can house this species in something that provides them some swimming space. Wish I had a Pic of the one at Aquatic imports in Charleston, it made the 125 he was in look tiny.
 

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cichlidaholic
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And I would love to share them with you. Truth is I lost all but a handfull of pics due to a hard drive failure. The only measured pic I have left of him is at 6". I only have that one because it was on a flash disk and not my computer.
 

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That fish is closer to 11" (measure from head to caudual penduncle). And even if you improperly measure it from tip to tail, its barely larger than the ruler.
So how again does this show that an average of 11"-12" is a "low end estimate" ?

I have owned MANY over the years. My last one just died at 12.3" @ 12 years old in a 150g tank by itself. This was my oldest and largest.
 

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cichlidaholic
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You can measure your fish how you like, doesn't make any difference as far as I'm concerned. I measure the whole fish , just the way I do it. Then again you seem to think a foot long fish is fine in a 55 ,where I would never consider this as I think it's equivilent to animal cruelty. It is obvious that we have very different philosophies in raising our fish . I know very well how large this species has the potential grow under proper care, and I see no problem what so ever with giving advice based on my experience . Whether it is in conflict with your experience or not.

I called it low end because I've seen many over the years that have exceeded 12" .I will conceed that the use of the phrase "low end" may have been a poor choice of words. Even if the fish in question in the original subject of this thread don't reach those proportions , they can very well reach the very average size of 10-12" which is still more than I feel is reasonable to house in a 55, and 75 being just adequate.

As far as I'm concerned this thread has been derailed more than enough , for now let's agree to disagree and allow the thread to continue as it should .
 

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rather you should agree to not give such poor information, and i believe we will be just fine :)

proper fish measurement is from the head to the caudal peduncle (regardless of how you measure it, this is how marine biologists and ichthyologists measure species for data recording).
average recorded size of this particular species is in the 11-12" range (though as with any species, a few larger ones will not be uncommon).

as you seem to have a hard time understanding the information that was already given, allow me to make it easier for you to understand.

it is possible to house a single midas in a 55g for life if proper care is taken to make sure its dietary, and water parameter requirements are met. you will also have to do frequent waterchanges to remove the GH hormones from the water which cause stunting (not tank size, as "some people" tend to believe).

a 75g tank is the recommended minimum tank size for a single midas.

it is not recommended that you keep a midas in a tank smaller than a 75g for life.

if all you have available is a 55g tank, it is absolutely possible to maintain a healthy and happy environment in that 55g tank, without stunting, or any other adverse effects to your fishes well being.

the larger tank you can provide for your fish, the better. this is not specific to any species, but rather a general rule of thumb.

hope this clears up your confusion, and any poor information you have received in the past.

best of luck *Glasses*
 

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cichlidaholic
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What seems to need to be cleared up is that I have not provided poor information at all . Rather that you seem incapable of accepting that any other information other than your own is valid . While yes it is a physical possibility to house a fish of any given size in any tank that physically permits it to be placed in it provided that the caregiver of said fish is willing to do any and all required maintenance to permit such an arrangement. I have been in this hobby for some time and I understand quite well the chemistry and biology at work in our tanks and the need and reasons for doing waterchanges. I do not equate tank size with the health of the fish, the keepers maintenance routine determines that . Rather that I believe that larger tank size provides some room for error and a bit of space for the fish to move about comfortably. Not to mention better overall stability. These are large fish and they need a tank that will suite them as such. Even if they are tiny now, we both know just how long that will last. I hardly see it being poor information to suggest that they be given one that provides more that 4 body lengths of space in which to swim when fully mature. Especially seeing as how you housed your last one.

I certainly hope your attitude isn't typical of the other members of this site. Good day.
 

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Ladies,ladies,ladies........Why don't you both get off your high horses,and chill.

A Midas can be kept in a 75 for life.Although it may be possible to keep one in a 55,no responsible fish keeper would do this,or recomend some else do it either.

Back to the OP question.Salt is only needed with freshwater fish to treat ich.All cichlids are freshwater,therefore no salt is needed.
 
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