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I actually like algae in my aquarium. I clean the algae off the tank glass, but let it grow anywhere else in the tank. I think it gives the tank a more natural appearance. Are there any dangers in doing so, or any benefits?
 

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There will always be some algae in your tank, unless you have a really efficient clean-up crew. The only thing you need to watch, for the sake of any fish you might have is, uncontrollable algae growth is the sign of too much light and too much nutrient, the latter if caused by overfeeding can cause some serious bio-load on your system and once the situation gets over-balanced to the bad side, meaning bad enough that your bio cant handle it you may start seeing die-off
 

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I keep my light and feeding controlled. It has built up for some time now on plants and other decorations, like I said I think it looks natural.
 

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I am like you Kristen, I only clean the front glass on my tanks and let regular algae grow in a thin layer on everything else. I do not allow any BGA to grow in my tanks and will go to extreme lengths to prevent it. BGA is really cyano-bacteria, not algae but it gets called algae in many places. As Jim said, you do not want to overfeed to the point that algae becomes a rampant mess and the biofilter starts having a hard time keeping up. Anything short of that is just treating the algae as one of the plants in your tank with all of the benefits that plants can provide. .
 

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I'm starting to see some grow on the leaves of my Amazon Swords. Doesn't really bother me. I clean the sides of my tank but leave some on the back wall (which I can't really see anyway) for the snails.
 

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I actually like algae in my aquarium. I clean the algae off the tank glass, but let it grow anywhere else in the tank. I think it gives the tank a more natural appearance. Are there any dangers in doing so, or any benefits?
Actually with marine tank your idea was the advice for saltwater tank back in the 70's and 80's. A good growth of algae swaying in the current was actually considered a sign of a healthy saltwater aquarium.

With Fw you can have the same effect with live plants and with saltwater macro algaes. so you get nice looking plant life. But with both there are fish that attack the plant life so in some case (especially marine) you need to protect the desirable plant life in some kind of refugium.

One "danger" is that cyano bacteria will start to take over the tank should the tank become nitrate starved. And the is very common. What I do is simply kill the lights for a few days until the cyano dies off and the tank environment favors the desirable plant life again.

Or some use algae turf scrubbers which are basically algae grown on screen external to the display. Then every so often one can clean part of the screens.

But I do like and agree with your thoughts.

but my agreement is worth at most .02
 

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Most algae are harmless in small amounts, but keep an eye out for the slimey blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) as this will deplete oxygen levels in your tank.

If you have plants, too much algae build up on the plant will block the plant from getting enough light. It will begin to die and release nutrients which then encourages more algae to grow on it. It is always a good idea to remove dead/dying leaves and clean leaves.

Another thing that I found causes algae is vacuuming your gravel. Let me explain this so that everyone does not stop vacuuming. Sometimes when you vacuum, you suck up gravel, so you turn your vacuum off or kink it. The gravel/mulm lands on plants, rocks, drifwood etc. If allowed to settle there, you will often notice algae growth. About an hour after I clean the tank and turn everything on, I gently agitate the water above plant and driftwood to remove the majority of the mulm/junk. This minimize algae growth...a decent underwater current also helps.
 

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All my algae is green. I've never heard of blue algae.

Cyano is also called blue green algae (bga). But that is not actually an algae but cyano bacteria.


Also there actually is a type of saltwater macro algae the is blue and called blue ball (othodes?)

my .02
 

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Okay, my tank is fairly new... I've got lots of plants in it and I'm starting to get a lot of algae. I don't mind but I"m getting a lot of it on my amazon sword leaves and I don't think my snails are going to keep up with it. What should I do? I read that some suggest turning off the lights but I'm trying to get the plants growing... Right now I've had the lights on a timer, 14 hours a day... guess I should cut back?
 

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Okay, my tank is fairly new... I've got lots of plants in it and I'm starting to get a lot of algae. I don't mind but I"m getting a lot of it on my amazon sword leaves and I don't think my snails are going to keep up with it. What should I do? I read that some suggest turning off the lights but I'm trying to get the plants growing... Right now I've had the lights on a timer, 14 hours a day... guess I should cut back?
Yes. there will be a point where your plants grow and algae does not.
 

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Brown algae (diatoms) is common in newly setup tanks. They like lower light and silica. They usually show up first in the corners and on tubing. They eventually go away with time, but oto cats will go to town on this type of algae.

For green, you nee to be more specific...hairy, fuzzy, spots, slimey (pics would help).
 
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